This week’s updates are:

1. Crime and policing news update: September 2013

2. Determining suitability to hold a scrap metal dealer’s licence – Statutory Guidance for Local Authorities.

3. Scrap Metal Dealers Act 2013: supplementary guidance

4. Licensing Act 2003: amended guidance issued under section 182 – Updated

5. NHBC new home registrations rise 25%

6. College of Policing Digest for October

7. Decline in House Building Blamed on Sprinkler Regulations

8. Three districts in line for under-performance designation?

9. Research map to boost policing and crime-reduction knowledge – College of Policing

10. Appeal – Lanarkshire – Rejected - Antisocial behaviour anticipated at McDonalds drive-through

11. New straw bales housing scheme.

12. Weymouth pushes voluntary ban on super-strength beer and cider

Visit the 'Secured By Design' web site for CPDA contact details, design guides, licence holders & application forms: www.securedbydesign.com

1. Crime and policing news update: September 2013
Is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/crime-and-policing-news-update-september-2013/crime-and-policing-news-update-september-2013
Within the newsletter is the publication of the ‘Strategic Intent’ outlines the College of Policing’s five core areas of responsibility, which are:
· setting standards of professional practice
· accrediting training providers and setting learning and development outcomes
· identifying, developing and promoting good practice based on evidence
· supporting police forces and other organisations to work together to protect the public and prevent crime
· identifying, developing and promoting ethics, values and standards of integrity

2. Determining suitability to hold a scrap metal dealer’s licence – Statutory Guidance for Local Authorities.
Direction on what information should be considered, such as offences, enforcement action, previous refusals or revocations and procedures in place that adhere to the provisions of the act.
Available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/determining-suitability-to-hold-a-scrap-metal-dealers-licence

3. Scrap Metal Dealers Act 2013: supplementary guidance
This guidance document represents the Home Office’s interpretation of the Scrap Metal Dealers’ Act 2013 at the point that it is published. However, ultimately, it will be for the courts to interpret the meaning of the legislation, and their construction will be binding.
Available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/scrap-metal-dealers-act-2013-supplementary-guidance

4. Licensing Act 2003: amended guidance issued under section 182 – Updated
Available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/98101/guidance-section-182-licensing.pdf
Section 182 of the Licensing Act 2003 provides that the Secretary of State must issue and, from time to time, may revise guidance to licensing. The latest version has a new section regarding, controlling the sale of alcohol. It also still contains paragraphs:
13.55 The statement of licensing policy should indicate that planning permission, building control approval and licensing regimes will be properly separated to avoid duplication and inefficiency. The planning and licensing regimes involve consideration of different (albeit related) matters. Licensing committees are not bound by decisions made by a planning committee, and vice versa.
13.56 There are circumstances when as a condition of planning permission, a terminal hour has been set for the use of premises for commercial purposes. Where these hours are different to the licensing hours, the applicant must observe the earlier closing time. Premises operating in breach of their planning permission would be liable to prosecution under planning law. Proper integration should be assured by licensing committees, where appropriate, providing regular reports to the planning committee.

5. NHBC new home registrations rise 25%
New home registrations in the UK have risen by 25% for the year up to and including August, new figures released by NHBC last week reveal. The figures show continued improvement around the country compared to the same period in 2012. In total 90,730 new homes have been registered in the first eight months of 2013, compared to 72,740 last year over this period. There was a marginal increase in August registrations compared to the same month last year (9,769 in 2013 compared to 9,553 in 2012) but the rolling quarter for June - August 2013 saw a 15% increase from the same three months last year (33,593 in 2013 compared to 29,272 in 2012). The increase in registrations over the course of the year compared to 2012 can be seen as proof of how various Government initiatives, such as the Help To Buy scheme, are helping in the delivery of new homes across the UK.

6. College of Policing Digest for October
Is available at: http://www.college.police.uk/en/20887.htm There is a section on the proposed ASB legislation is progressing through Parliament..

7. Decline in House Building Blamed on Sprinkler Regulations
"Bizarre" over-regulation of new homes built in Wales has been criticised for causing a continued slump in home building in the country. Welsh Secretary David Jones told Conservative Party Conference delegates (Wednesday) that unnecessary red tape in Wales, including the requirement for sprinklers to be installed in all new homes, had contributed to a 32 per cent decline in new home registrations there in the period from May to July (compared with a year earlier). In the same period, registrations increased 34 per cent in England, he said. In Labour-run Wales, regulations on builders are considerably more onerous than in England, including the bizarre proposal to fit every new house with a sprinkler system.
The consequence of this over-regulation is that fewer houses are being built in Wales. Last week, one of the biggest builders of homes in Wales, Persimmon Homes, said it would stop building houses in parts of the South Wales valleys, because they do not make money. The builder blamed red tape, saying that homes cost around £3,000 more to build in Wales than in England and sell for less.
Regulations that would force builders to install sprinklers in all new buildings were originally intended to take effect in 2013, but a phased introduction was announced this year. Under this plan, new high-risk properties such as care homes and university halls will be required to have sprinklers from April 2014. The regulations will not apply to other houses until January 2016. So the current downturn in the Welsh house building market cannot be directly apportioned to the new sprinkler regulations. However, the looming threat of them taking effect in 2013 could have put some builders off. More at: http://www.ifsecglobal.com/author.asp?section_id=414&doc_id=561378

8. Three districts in line for under-performance designation?
The latest official statistics on the performance of English planning authorities suggests that three district councils – Blaby, Halton and Worthing - are potential candidates to be designated as underperforming, enabling planning applications to be made directly to the Planning Inspectorate. Figures published by the Department for Communities and Local Government under the auspices of the UK Statistics Authority showed that all three councils determined fewer than 30 per cent of major planning applications within 13 weeks in the two-year period from July 2011 to July 2013. That is one of the ‘triggers’ for designation. The figures also revealed that 26 councils are potential candidates for designation as a result of determining fewer than 30 per cent of major county matter applications involving minerals and waste developments within the statutory period. Access the statistics.

9. Research map to boost policing and crime-reduction knowledge – College of Policing
A new interactive map of current academic research on policing and crime reduction is launched 03/10/2013 by the College of Policing. The Policing and Crime Reduction Research Map, hosted on the College website, allows researchers and academics from any institution to share summaries of relevant and ongoing research at Masters level and above. Summaries of completed and ongoing randomised control trials in police forces will also be shared. A small number of studies are already online and the College is calling on policing and crime reduction researchers to get involved so that a national picture of current research can be developed. The map will allow everyone to see how the evidence base is growing as new research is added. Current research featured on the map includes public confidence in policing, racial and religious hate crime and behavioural analysis of robbery cases. The map will also help to deliver one of the priorities for the College - the new professional body for policing – to capture and share the best available evidence of what works in reducing crime to enable police forces to use their resources more effectively to protect the public.
College Chair, Professor Shirley Pearce, said: “A key priority for The College of Policing is to support evidence based policing and the research map is an important part of establishing what the knowledge base for policing really is. We are keen to see academics and practitioners working more closely together and the research map will be an important tool to aid and support those collaborations. This is part of wider work of the College which promotes regional and national partnerships between forces and educational institutions to develop an environment in which knowledge grows and is used to inform practice.”
Rachel Tuffin, College of Policing’s Head of Research, Analysis and Information, said:
“Researchers, forces and all those involved with crime reduction should be able to spot opportunities to collaborate, avoid duplication and find gaps where the research is needed. The more information we can share, the faster we can develop the research evidence base for policing and crime reduction.”
Work to produce a national research map is only one part of the work of the College of Policing to identify, develop and promote good policing practice based on research evidence of what really works in reducing crime. The College is also hosting the newly established What Works Centre for Crime Reduction, one of a national network of six centres including health, education, ageing, local growth and early intervention. The Centre will draw together a strong collaboration of leading UK universities, the police service and crime reduction partners, to review existing evidence on crime reduction practices and interventions. A key output will be an accessible, clearly labelled evidence base. All robustly evaluated crime reduction interventions will be listed and ranked according to strength of evidence, cost and impact on reducing crime. A consortium of eight universities has been awarded a grant co-funded by the Economic and Social Research Council and the College of Policing to support the Centre. The consortium includes expertise from University College London, the Institute of Education, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Birkbeck, Cardiff, Dundee, Surrey and Southampton universities. More at: http://college.pressofficeadmin.com/component/content/article/45-press-releases/651 & http://www.college.police.uk/en/20878.htm
& http://www.college.police.uk/en/20018.htm

10. Appeal – Lanarkshire – Rejected - Antisocial behaviour anticipated at McDonalds drive-through
A McDonalds restaurant and drive-through in Lanarkshire was rejected because it would harm highway safety and the living conditions of neighbours. The land was currently occupied by a car wash, a reporter observed, which operated seven days a week on a drive-through basis similar to that proposed at the restaurant and takeaway. The existing two-way access off the road would be used to serve a one-way drive-through loop around the restaurant building. No traffic figures had been submitted for the car wash use but it appeared to be a thriving operation.
The reporter found that the proposal would result in a significant increase in traffic using the end of the road close to a junction with a roundabout. In addition, the restaurant would be open for breakfast when, he reasoned, traffic flows out of the residential area were likely to be at their highest. Delays in getting onto a roundabout were a source of frustration in motorists, he held, which could lead them to take risks to the detriment of highway safety. Furthermore, the restaurant peak times would mainly coincide with rush hour traffic in the evenings when people were returning home. He remarked that although the existing traffic flows to the car wash might be tolerated, because it was there when they bought their properties, the residents were not expecting a busy McDonalds restaurant at the entrance to their estate.
The reporter accepted that noise levels from the restaurant itself would be within acceptable limits and he was satisfied that there would not be a problem with cooking odours. He also noted that McDonalds had a policy of regularly clearing all litter, not just their own, from the immediate vicinity. Nevertheless, he found that there was a risk of antisocial behaviour that was not uncommon at takeaway outlets and that 24-hour opening was likely to result in noise generated by late night customers which would seriously detract from residents’ peaceful enjoyment of their properties.
Reporter John Martin; Written representations.

11. New straw bales housing scheme
A development of four affordable ‘straw bale’ Hastoe homes in High Ongar, Essex, has been officially opened by Eric Pickles MP. This is the first development of straw bale housing built in Britain by a housing association. Two 2-bedroom and two 3-bedroom houses have been developed by Hastoe Housing Association at Millfield in partnership with Epping Forest District Council, on former Council-owned land. The houses have been let at affordable rents to families on the Council’s housing register. Hastoe has filmed the build process and will release time-lapse footage and interviews with the key people involved to share knowledge within the industry. More at: http://www.homesandcommunities.co.uk/news/hastoe-strawbale-housing-officially-opened-eric-pickles

12. Weymouth pushes voluntary ban on super-strength beer and cider
Off-licences in a famous Dorset resort have joined a voluntary ban on selling super-strength beer and cider, as part of a public health scheme involving councils, the police and the NHS.
Seven shops in Weymouth have signed up to the initiative, which takes its lead from the ‘Reducing the Strength’ campaign in Ipswich.
Suffolk Police have reported a cut in crime as a result of the fact that nearly two thirds of Ipswich off-licences now no longer stock low-price beers and ciders with an alcohol level of more than 6.5%.
The sale of super-strength alcohol is being tackled in Dorset. Between July 2012 and July 2013 there were 385 incidents of alcohol related crime in Weymouth town centre.
A Weymouth and Portland BC council spokesman said it is hoped all supermarkets, off-licences and shops in Weymouth would eventually join to help crackdown on anti-social behaviour.
More at: http://www.localgov.co.uk/index.cfm?method=news.detail&id=111212

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